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Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by noleisthebest on Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:24 am

Tenez wrote:Those clips of Fed at 18/19 are interesting. Clearly the talent was there and of course we will see the full extend of it 10 years later.

What really distinguishes Fed from the rest is that grace on the court: Making things look easy, effortless with time to spare.

That grace was perceptible from 2001...when he beat Pete in Wimbledon but even more obvious as he got past 2008. McEnroe also had that grace in 1984 he was then 25 I believe.

The environment to show such grace is more and more difficult. McEnroe had it easy when facing a Connors in 84 Wimbledon. The physical side of the game could not be compared with today's.
What's so amazing about Fed is that he displaying that excess of time to spare even nowadays.

My question is will Shapo show some of that grace as he matures?
I think so.
Interesting you linked grace with age(ing).

How do you explain it “needs” time, pure number of balls hit?
Polishing the gem kind of thing?

Shap has two years to catch up with Fed’s 2001.

I wonder how many top 50SBH-ers played in 2001.

In 2020, there will be 4.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by Tenez on Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:35 am

noleisthebest wrote:Interesting you linked grace with age(ing).
I had not until I saw those old clips of Federer. I knew he had that grace in 2001 cause the way he returned Pete's serve without looking as impressive as Agassi....simply because he reads the ball earlier than Andre and looks less rushed.

How do you explain it “needs” time, pure number of balls hit?
Polishing the gem kind of thing?
Most likely but also a natural sense of anticipation.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by legendkillar on Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:35 am

Tenez wrote:
My question is will Shapo show some of that grace as he matures?
I think so.

I think he will. When you have someone with so much talent in abundance, the key is for them to know how to harness and make best use of it. When you're young you tend to be full of energy and beans and want to throw yourself into everything and challenge it. 

Provided there is wisdom in his coaching set up, he will prevail. I hope he never ends anything near like Tomic who if he had someone with an ounce of sense or wisdom in his set up, would've achieved much more with the talent.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by Tenez on Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:38 am

legendkillar wrote:
Tenez wrote:
My question is will Shapo show some of that grace as he matures?
I think so.

I think he will. When you have someone with so much talent in abundance, the key is for them to know how to harness and make best use of it. When you're young you tend to be full of energy and beans and want to throw yourself into everything and challenge it. 

Provided there is wisdom in his coaching set up, he will prevail. I hope he never ends anything near like Tomic who if he had someone with an ounce of sense or wisdom in his set up, would've achieved much more with the talent.
Bar injury I know he will win slams...no doubt. My question is will he look like he is gliding on court with time to spare a la Federer?

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by noleisthebest on Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:42 am

Tenez wrote:
noleisthebest wrote:Interesting you linked grace with age(ing).
I had not until I saw those old clips of Federer. I knew he had that grace in 2001 cause the way he returned Pete's serve without looking as impressive as Agassi....simply because he reads the ball earlier than Andre and looks less rushed.

How do you explain it “needs” time, pure number of balls hit?
Polishing the gem kind of thing?
Most likely but also a natural sense of anticipation.

Yes...
Would you say that’s the integral part of playing instinctive tennis?

Nowing where to be before your brain processes the information and “tells you” as well as sending the ball where you “want” it before you want it is something really fascinating.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by noleisthebest on Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:44 am

Tenez wrote:
legendkillar wrote:
Tenez wrote:
My question is will Shapo show some of that grace as he matures?
I think so.

I think he will. When you have someone with so much talent in abundance, the key is for them to know how to harness and make best use of it. When you're young you tend to be full of energy and beans and want to throw yourself into everything and challenge it. 

Provided there is wisdom in his coaching set up, he will prevail. I hope he never ends anything near like Tomic who if he had someone with an ounce of sense or wisdom in his set up, would've achieved much more with the talent.
Bar injury I know he will win slams...no doubt. My question is will he look like he is gliding on court with time to spare a la Federer?
Shapo is not a glider, but he has bags of excitement in his game.

I certainly won’t comdemn him in advance.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by legendkillar on Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:49 am

Tenez wrote:
legendkillar wrote:
Tenez wrote:
My question is will Shapo show some of that grace as he matures?
I think so.

I think he will. When you have someone with so much talent in abundance, the key is for them to know how to harness and make best use of it. When you're young you tend to be full of energy and beans and want to throw yourself into everything and challenge it. 

Provided there is wisdom in his coaching set up, he will prevail. I hope he never ends anything near like Tomic who if he had someone with an ounce of sense or wisdom in his set up, would've achieved much more with the talent.
Bar injury I know he will win slams...no doubt. My question is will he look like he is gliding on court with time to spare a la Federer?

Probably not. There's a high octane energy to Shapo's game, where Federer is much more effortless. 

Almost like Federer walking on water and Shapo would be almost like skiing across it.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by barrystar on Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:21 am

legendkillar wrote:
Tenez wrote:
legendkillar wrote:
Tenez wrote:
My question is will Shapo show some of that grace as he matures?
I think so.

I think he will. When you have someone with so much talent in abundance, the key is for them to know how to harness and make best use of it. When you're young you tend to be full of energy and beans and want to throw yourself into everything and challenge it. 

Provided there is wisdom in his coaching set up, he will prevail. I hope he never ends anything near like Tomic who if he had someone with an ounce of sense or wisdom in his set up, would've achieved much more with the talent.
Bar injury I know he will win slams...no doubt. My question is will he look like he is gliding on court with time to spare a la Federer?

Probably not. There's a high octane energy to Shapo's game, where Federer is much more effortless

Almost like Federer walking on water and Shapo would be almost like skiing across it.

I think 'effortless' is a dangerous word to apply to Federer, especially when you consider what hard work his excellent footwork must be, and how excellent his defence can be; but he certainly has the appearance of effortlessness.  Also, it's fair to say that, as excellent as his footwork is, he manages to hit great shots in positions from which he has no right to do so, e.g. his half-volleying, which might even be thought of as lazy in a lesser player, but which no doubt saves him some mileage overall as well as enabling him to play further forward.  Whilst having a huge array of shots at your disposal can confuse, if, like him, you get on top of it I would imagine that the mind can be relaxed because there are more genuine options available in lots of difficult situations - more freedom, less fear.  Against that, he probably has to make more small quick changes of direction than other guys who stand back and play with less variety - that is a point his coaches make when referring to risks on his back.

Overall I'd say 'smooth and instinctive' is a more accurate description than 'effortless', and it also reflects that other characteristic of Fed's game, that it seems to take less out of him than with others.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by Tenez on Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:44 am

barrystar wrote:...Whilst having a huge array of shots at your disposal can confuse, if, like him, you get on top of it I would imagine that the mind can be relaxed because there are more genuine options available in lots of difficult situations - more freedom, less fear. 

I'd say the opposite in fact. Not because I fancy a debate but because the facts and history prove it otherwise, and it;s common sense. All shot makers in the history of sport, and tennis in particular, take longer to mature than those who play with simple high margin, and therefore more physical games (Borg/Wilander/Chang/Hewitt/Nadal/Djoko to name a few) because those kind of games are much easier on the mind as the task is really simple: bringing a ball back and make sure the margins for winners for their opponents are as tights as possible so that when comes the important points, one is more likely to draw that UEs than getting a winner.

Fed's game is all down to execution of those small margins shots. And that is toughest on the mind. This is exactly why RRunners don't even want to go there and prefer to slug it out between themselves, cause of course they can all pull winners at any time but the ratio %age won't be high under pressure.

This is what is amazing with Federer is that he plays teh game as if the mind was relaxed and the stress of that mind does not seem to interfere with the pressure of executing risky shots under worst pressure. And this is what makes him a 20 slams champion when all other great shot makers in the history of the game managed to pull slams there and then without ever surpassing 7/8 slams in the open era. when they had a good day or even so a few good days in a row. Road runner largely surpass the number of slams won by those smaller margins players.

Pete might be the exception though the fast conditions back then made his serve a very relaxing tool as clay makes Nadal very relax since not many has his fitness to challenge him there.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by Tenez on Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:51 am

Even in the last 15 years (Fed's "era"i) f you had up the slams of "counter punchers" to put it nicely versus shot makers, the number of slams won by those CP largely overtake shot makers. Essentially cause that retrieving game is so much easier on the mind.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by barrystar on Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:59 am

Tenez wrote:
barrystar wrote:...Whilst having a huge array of shots at your disposal can confuse, if, like him, you get on top of it I would imagine that the mind can be relaxed because there are more genuine options available in lots of difficult situations - more freedom, less fear. 

I'd say the opposite in fact. Not because I fancy a debate but because the facts and history prove it otherwise, and it;s common sense. All shot makers in the history of sport, and tennis in particular, take longer to mature than those who play with simple high margin, and therefore more physical games (Borg/Wilander/Chang/Hewitt/Nadal/Djoko to name a few) because those kind of games are much easier on the mind as the task is really simple: bringing a ball back and make sure the margins for winners for their opponents are as tights as possible so that when comes the important points, one is more likely to draw that UEs than getting a winner.

Fed's game is all down to execution of those small margins shots. And that is toughest on the mind. This is exactly why RRunners don't even want to go there and prefer to slug it out between themselves, cause of course they can all pull winners at any time but the ratio %age won't be high under pressure.

This is what is amazing with Federer is that he plays teh game as if the mind was relaxed and the stress of that mind does not seem to interfere with the pressure of executing risky shots under worst pressure. And this is what makes him a 20 slams champion when all other great shot makers in the history of the game managed to pull slams there and then without ever surpassing 7/8 slams in the open era. when they had a good day or even so a few good days in a row. Road runner largely surpass the number of slams won by those smaller margins players.

Pete might be the exception though the fast conditions back then made his serve a very relaxing tool as clay makes Nadal very relax since not many has his fitness to challenge him there.

Those are fair points, and I agree, but I am asking something a bit different.  What if Federer has done what nobody else has done before, he has mastered dealing with those options?  He knows he can stand up because if he has to he can play a good half volley, or volley from mid court, or achieve some absurd angle with a swishy squash shot or curve it around the post to pass someone at the net; he also knows his opponent is similarly aware of what he can do.  Sure, getting there is painful and most don't try it because there are safer less taxing options; but once you are there - Nirvana.  One of the reasons why he is so popular is that he digs out moments like that regularly, every few games, whilst for others it's a once in a match shot.  He's been doing this for his entire time on tour - isn't it arguable at least that the likelihood is that he has gotten over any mental difficulties associated with executing these astonishing shots.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by Tenez on Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:08 am

Yes he has got over the mental difficulty....or maybe he makes it look that way. However, when comes an important point and still has to flick that SHBH down the line to save Wimbledon 08, for instance, he knows the margins are thin of pulling it, yet he goes for it.

This ability to switch off, or even better, "contain" this fear factor is as impressive as his shot making skills.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by noleisthebest on Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:18 am

barrystar wrote:

I think 'effortless' is a dangerous word to apply to Federer, especially when you consider what hard work his excellent footwork must be, and how excellent his defence can be; but he certainly has the appearance of effortlessness.  Also, it's fair to say that, as excellent as his footwork is, he manages to hit great shots in positions from which he has no right to do so, e.g. his half-volleying, which might even be thought of as lazy in a lesser player, but which no doubt saves him some mileage overall as well as enabling him to play further forward.  Whilst having a huge array of shots at your disposal can confuse, if, like him, you get on top of it I would imagine that the mind can be relaxed because there are more genuine options available in lots of difficult situations - more freedom, less fear.  Against that, he probably has to make more small quick changes of direction than other guys who stand back and play with less variety - that is a point his coaches make when referring to risks on his back.

Overall I'd say 'smooth and instinctive' is a more accurate description than 'effortless', and it also reflects that other characteristic of Fed's game, that it seems to take less out of him than with others.

I think if there is one word to describe Federer it is certainly effortless.

Even my tennis illiterate mum noticed that first time she saw him play....”like he is holding a conductor’s baton” or a piece of straw in his hand just sending the ball where he likes.

Not to mention zero grunting and barely any sweat...the complete opposite from Nadal.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by noleisthebest on Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:20 am

Tenez wrote:Yes he has got over the mental difficulty....or maybe he makes it look that way. However, when comes an important point and still has to flick that SHBH down the line to save Wimbledon 08, for instance, he knows the margins are thin of pulling it, yet he goes for it.

This ability to switch off, or even better, "contain" this fear factor is as impressive as his shot making skills.
I’d say this is his most impressive skill.
To go for (and pull off) toughest shots in toughest moments.

Awesome.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by legendkillar on Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:21 am

barrystar wrote:
legendkillar wrote:
Tenez wrote:
legendkillar wrote:
Tenez wrote:
My question is will Shapo show some of that grace as he matures?
I think so.

I think he will. When you have someone with so much talent in abundance, the key is for them to know how to harness and make best use of it. When you're young you tend to be full of energy and beans and want to throw yourself into everything and challenge it. 

Provided there is wisdom in his coaching set up, he will prevail. I hope he never ends anything near like Tomic who if he had someone with an ounce of sense or wisdom in his set up, would've achieved much more with the talent.
Bar injury I know he will win slams...no doubt. My question is will he look like he is gliding on court with time to spare a la Federer?

Probably not. There's a high octane energy to Shapo's game, where Federer is much more effortless

Almost like Federer walking on water and Shapo would be almost like skiing across it.

I think 'effortless' is a dangerous word to apply to Federer, especially when you consider what hard work his excellent footwork must be, and how excellent his defence can be; but he certainly has the appearance of effortlessness.  Also, it's fair to say that, as excellent as his footwork is, he manages to hit great shots in positions from which he has no right to do so, e.g. his half-volleying, which might even be thought of as lazy in a lesser player, but which no doubt saves him some mileage overall as well as enabling him to play further forward.  Whilst having a huge array of shots at your disposal can confuse, if, like him, you get on top of it I would imagine that the mind can be relaxed because there are more genuine options available in lots of difficult situations - more freedom, less fear.  Against that, he probably has to make more small quick changes of direction than other guys who stand back and play with less variety - that is a point his coaches make when referring to risks on his back.

Overall I'd say 'smooth and instinctive' is a more accurate description than 'effortless', and it also reflects that other characteristic of Fed's game, that it seems to take less out of him than with others.

I don't think it is dangerous. As it's not by implication he puts in less effort than anyone else, but more reflective that he isn't appearing to be busting a gut to get around the court, or seemingly taking deep breaths or sweating like the proverbial pig.

Tomato/tomahto

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by legendkillar on Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:45 am

Tenez wrote:
barrystar wrote:...Whilst having a huge array of shots at your disposal can confuse, if, like him, you get on top of it I would imagine that the mind can be relaxed because there are more genuine options available in lots of difficult situations - more freedom, less fear. 

I'd say the opposite in fact. Not because I fancy a debate but because the facts and history prove it otherwise, and it;s common sense. All shot makers in the history of sport, and tennis in particular, take longer to mature than those who play with simple high margin, and therefore more physical games (Borg/Wilander/Chang/Hewitt/Nadal/Djoko to name a few) because those kind of games are much easier on the mind as the task is really simple: bringing a ball back and make sure the margins for winners for their opponents are as tights as possible so that when comes the important points, one is more likely to draw that UEs than getting a winner.

Fed's game is all down to execution of those small margins shots. And that is toughest on the mind. This is exactly why RRunners don't even want to go there and prefer to slug it out between themselves, cause of course they can all pull winners at any time but the ratio %age won't be high under pressure.

This is what is amazing with Federer is that he plays teh game as if the mind was relaxed and the stress of that mind does not seem to interfere with the pressure of executing risky shots under worst pressure. And this is what makes him a 20 slams champion when all other great shot makers in the history of the game managed to pull slams there and then without ever surpassing 7/8 slams in the open era. when they had a good day or even so a few good days in a row. Road runner largely surpass the number of slams won by those smaller margins players.

Pete might be the exception though the fast conditions back then made his serve a very relaxing tool as clay makes Nadal very relax since not many has his fitness to challenge him there.

I won't disagree with your perception of Federer, however I will disagree with point that having the game on your racquet carries more pressure than not having it on your racquet.

If I had the shot arsenal of a Federer, there would be a part of me that is relaxed in the knowledge that if my opponent dumps a short ball, I have a shot that will dispatch that for a winner. 

Take Murray for example. The best case I can think of a player that doesn't have that self-confidence or belief that he can execute his riskier shots on a consistent basis and hence resorts to the real dogged pushing game. Because of that, what you have is a guy who knows he has to play to a certain length if he is to draw an error. Most if not all the time he can never find that length that will trouble say a Federer. So Murray is approaching his matches with the mindset it's not on his racquet, but his opponent's and one short ball can be the difference between a UE from the opponent or a winner. That for me is a crap pressure to live under. That's why in a small way I admire Djokovic and Nadal because they find the length that troubles Federer. Inch away from the baseline and it restricts the shots available to him and hence for me why their game was much more effective against Federer than Murray's who by all accounts is the whipping boy.

I've been in matches when shamefully I've been a Roadrunner. Purely because my opponent is that good, however they are never going to cough up the amount of short balls or lofted shots for me to be an aggressor and so by default I go to "play not to lose" mindset and even when it dawns on me I will, do it with a respectable scoreline  Laugh Laugh  I just wonder Ten have you like me ever been in a game with someone and they are making all the shots and yet the rare sniff you get you can't make yours and when the opponent makes another winner for the umpteenth time you look across the net and think "I could make those shots if I had the returns I was coughing up" I can imagine for most RR's on tour, that's what it's like sometimes.

Whilst I agree it takes huge courage and belief to go for and pull an audacious winner, I think it takes balls to approach a match without the intent to win, but rather not to lose. Purely because you are accepting your opponent is better than you.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by Tenez on Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:23 pm

legendkillar wrote:I won't disagree with your perception of Federer, however I will disagree with point that having the game on your racquet carries more pressure than not having it on your racquet.

If I had the shot arsenal of a Federer, there would be a part of me that is relaxed in the knowledge that if my opponent dumps a short ball, I have a shot that will dispatch that for a winner.
 A few players have great shot making skills. Maybe not as good as fed, but a lot can pull winners out of short and average balls. Not many can execute them under those pressure situations. Nadal, Murray and Djokovic's success is full of matches they should have lost or could have lost sets and matches even but overturned the result thanks to their opponent not having the ability to keep plugging those great shots on key points. Even Federer has a history of failing to convert those SPs, BPs and MPs v Nadal and Djoko. However give Nadal a short ball and you will see how he is going to send you pick a daisy in the neighbouring flushing meadows with huge margins to spare. Has federer ever won a match v Djoko, Nadal and Murray while MP down? I don;t think so...2 of them however have.

Take Murray for example. The best case I can think of a player that doesn't have that self-confidence or belief that he can execute his riskier shots on a consistent basis and hence resorts to the real dogged pushing game. Because of that, what you have is a guy who knows he has to play to a certain length if he is to draw an error. Most if not all the time he can never find that length that will trouble say a Federer. So Murray is approaching his matches with the mindset it's not on his racquet, but his opponent's and one short ball can be the difference between a UE from the opponent or a winner.
Might not be your best example to support your point. Murray's is far more successful than many other players who have much better shots than him. Take his matches v Gasquet for instance. How many of those did he win by taking the match to the distance after having been made looked average by even a mentally weak Gasquet. Murray simply has not got the guile and more importantly the minimum moving skills required to trouble a fit Federer. Yet he has done pretty well v Federer in spite of teh huge difference in shot making skills. Murray if anything has achieved more than he should ever have v federer by constantly winning those matches where Fed was sub par. Other players coudl not even beat a sub par Federer cause they could not tire him down.


That for me is a crap pressure to live under. That's why in a small way I admire Djokovic and Nadal because they find the length that troubles Federer. Inch away from the baseline and it restricts the shots available to him and hence for me why their game was much more effective against Federer than Murray's who by all accounts is the whipping boy.
That is a great achievement considering the difference in talent, certainly, but it does not make it tough mentally for Nadal and Djoko. When they get beaten it's simply cause the other guy has simply pulled enough winners over 3 or 5 sets. There is no stress mentally cause they is no need to pick a shot selection amongst a variety of shots at disposal but more importantly the shot they play is not as risky, so much easier on the mind.

This stress on the attacking players is even felt by the crowd. Just remember yourself watching Djoko v Stan's matches for instance and you will remember the apprehension we have to see Stan making an UEs at any time trying to pull a winner v Djoko or Nadal.


I've been in matches when shamefully I've been a Roadrunner.
Say no more.  Winking

Purely because my opponent is that good, however they are never going to cough up the amount of short balls or lofted shots for me to be an aggressor and so by default I go to "play not to lose" mindset and even when it dawns on me I will, do it with a respectable scoreline  Laugh Laugh
And why do you do this? cause you don't wish, or fear maybe, gove the point too easily by giving then an UE. Isn't it? So the more you run, the less you stress your mind.

  I just wonder Ten have you like me ever been in a game with someone and they are making all the shots and yet the rare sniff you get you can't make yours and when the opponent makes another winner for the umpteenth time you look across the net and think "I could make those shots if I had the returns I was coughing up" I can imagine for most RR's on tour, that's what it's like sometimes.
Importantly a RR for one is an attacking player for another (as you, and can all, experience). Typically Djoko and Murray become the aggressive players when playing Nadal on clay. Yes I come across many much better shot makers than me.  Sad  but I have rarely played against players who were lazier, stamina deficient, than me so I often turn to be the one trying to shorten the point...and that means taking risk and that means failing on big points. People in my club will tell you that my tennis is far much better in club session, in a stressless environment, than in competition...unless I am in a good day and am already leading or the opposition is better and have nothing to lose (that's when I am playing my best).  

Whilst I agree it takes huge courage and belief to go for and pull an audacious winner,
I think it takes balls to approach a match without the intent to win, but rather not to lose.
Purely because you are accepting your opponent is better than you.
Much disagree with that. For teh same reason it is much easier to go to a job interview for a job you don;t quite fancy as opposed to a job you really want.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by legendkillar on Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:58 pm

1) I think that goes back to Federer at certain points in time has by accounts "blinked" Wim 2014 in the 5th set was clear example for me of that where I think he was matched by Djokovic, but succumbed by giving away some UE's that cost him that match. Even players, that as you say play without fear, are guilty of thinking even if it's momentarily. The beach ball effect as they call it psychology. 

2) Murray's a great point actually because even though you've raised me a Gasquet, Gasquet is an example of someone who folded mentally and physically quite easily and it was only when he got fitter some of the fragility lifted. Was it 2016 when he beat Wawrinka at Wimbledon and actually looked solid? Even though Murray has been successful, it's been large in part to the weaknesses of his opponents. It's why with Murray you'll see he has been vulnerable to big hitters who play without the fear of physical limitations. 

3) The more I run the more I am stressed!  Laugh Laugh Purely because I know I can pull shots that make life easier and can win the point. However, I have on many occasions come against much better shot makers and so much running seems a hopeless endeavour because I can find myself having to go through self doubt questioning if I have the right shots. But also it's mindset. I can only ever recall one match in which I was a set down and at 5-4 serving to stay in at 0-40 down. Was an error fest I must confess and my opponent went conservative. Managed to hold and win the TB and then win the 3rd 6-4 because I then went out all attack because my opponent showed a rare weakness and went conservative. The only time I can I hit my out of match. Most of the time I am just a UE machine.

5) Don't know if I agree with that paradox. I treat my career very much like Chess. It's a set of strategic moves to get to the point of checkmate. So I (currently) suffer a job I don't want to do with all my heart, because I know the next move will be for a job I do want. It's acquiring the experience and importantly finishing a qualification that makes me stronger for the next move.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by noleisthebest on Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:53 pm

Tenez wrote:
Much disagree with that. For teh same reason it is much easier to go to a job interview for a job you don;t quite fancy as opposed to a job you really want.

So true!

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by bogbrush on Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:36 pm

noleisthebest wrote:
Tenez wrote:
Much disagree with that. For teh same reason it is much easier to go to a job interview for a job you don;t quite fancy as opposed to a job you really want.

So true!
Really? You both find it easier to articulate a determination and conviction to do something you're not that fussed about doing rather than the thing you do?

Bizarre.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by legendkillar on Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:05 pm

Laugh Laugh

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

Post by Tenez on Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:12 pm

bogbrush wrote:
noleisthebest wrote:
Tenez wrote:
Much disagree with that. For teh same reason it is much easier to go to a job interview for a job you don;t quite fancy as opposed to a job you really want.

So true!
Really? You both find it easier to articulate a determination and conviction to do something you're not that fussed about doing rather than the thing you do?

Bizarre.
What's so bizarre? You are no different I am sure. If you play a big pressure point, you are likely to play it with much more stress than playing a point no-one cares about at the social session. The little drop shot gem which amazes your opponent at club session is most likely to be in the net or way too high if it is a very important point.

This is why professional tennis players avoid using talent.

If you can't quite make the difference that's probably cause you have not played pressure point.

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Re: Baby Fed 3: Denis Shapovalov

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